Why Sail a Santana 20 Keelboat?

Excerpt of Letter from Bruce Golison

Bruce Golison is the organizer of the prestigious Golison and Golison Race Week in Long Beach (also known as Boatscape.Com / North Sails Race Week). He is the new owner of one of the newest Santana 20's - 2000 model and was 2nd place at this year's Santana 20 National Championships.

As a new Santana 20 owner for the second time over a 22 year period, I was asked to share my thoughts on coming back to the class and how it compares to other sailing that I have done over the past 22 years.  Actually for the past 5 years, I have not done much sailing with an active young son at home. 

This year I decided to get back into the class with a long time friend of mine, Steve Washburn for several reasons:

1. I wanted a new challenge after sailing in the Cal 20 class for the past ten years. 
2. I wanted a boat that I could travel with. Experiencing different locations, new competitors and varied sailing conditions makes for a great time. Combine this with making new friends in different locations and you have a wonderful experience.
3. Steve and I have young sons who we want to get into sailing and Steve's eleven year old in particular was ready to try racing with spinnakers.

Once we decided to get a new boat, Steve and I had to decide what kind of boat to get. Prior to my getting a Cal 20, I had campaigned a J/24 for eight years. Our J/24 travels took us from Key West, to Sydney, Australia, to Seattle, to San Francisco and to the Texas Circuit (a series consisting of regattas in Dallas, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Ft. Worth, Corpus Christi and Shreveport, LA). One year we actually put over 40,000 miles on our trailer! The J/24 provided us with great competition and life long sailing friends.  Since racing the J/24 successfully takes a crew of five, and they can't be your young children, that boat didn't fit into our current equation. The Melges 24, although a wonderful class, possed the same issues regarding having our young kids race with us. Remembering the fun that I had had with my first Santana, I started to do some research on the class.

I was happy to learn of a "rebirth" in the class and that there were active fleets around the western states.  The fact that there were good sailors competing in the class was also very important to us. Combing these factors with the fact that our kids could race with us, the Santana 20 was our choice!

We decided to get a new boat so that we would have all the developments of the class built right into the boat. We wanted to be competitive "right out of the box". This proved to be a great decision. Tom Schock has done a great job keeping the production boats up to date with class innovations. Combine this with the latest construction techniques and our boat was fast from the first time we stepped on board. At the just completed nationals, we sailed with an absolutely stock Santana 20 right off the Schock production line, and placed second! I would recommend a new boat to anyone.

Bruce Golison
Hull #919

Comments from S20 Sailors

 

  • "The that performs like a dinghy, but SAILS like a keelboat"
  • "Santana 20's are fairly inexpensive compared to other keelboats. Because it is usually dry-docked, bottom maintenance and slip fees are usually minimal."
  • "For a boat of its size, it performs very well. It is one of the faster 20 foot keelboats and can outperform many 25 foot cruising boats."
  • "An S20 is a complex boat. It has almost the same controls as larger keelboats and is a great learning platform for younger sailors.".
  • "Santana 20's are sailed in the open oceans of Southern California as well as inland lakes. This speaks to the flexibility and adaptability of this boat."

 

Why Join the Santana 20 Class?

Renew Your Membership Today!

 

The Benefits

  • The Santana Class is very lucky to have so many world class level sailors. As a member of the class you get a Class Yearbook with access to the membership list. This is important because this class is known for exceptional support given by the more knowledgeable sailors to the class newcomers. Being a class member gives you the opportunity to meet these sailors. From Tom Schock, our boat builder to renown sailing instructors like Andrew Kerr, or past and present class champions, you will get the help that you need to go faster and be a better sailor. And everyone is approachable. By knowing who's in the class and having the ability to get in touch with the other members, and giving them the ability to get in touch with you, you will find yourself already a step ahead in your racing campaign.
  • Part of the benefits of membership is the Class Newsletter. Published several times a year, tips and techniques as well as news of regattas and special events are regular features of the newsletter. Just the technical tips alone are immeasurable and most of these are not discussed in great detail on the bulletin board.
  • If you think you are in touch with the class goings-on just by checking out the Bulletin Board, you may be surprised that another layer of communications occur for members only.
  • Top level one-design competition occurs at class sanctioned National and Regional events where Class Membership is required.
  • You will have the chance to participate in special events such as "racing clinics" which are conducted regularly each year at various locations. Membership allows us to notify you since we will have your contact information.
  • Members get a vote at the Annual Meeting which allow you to participate in making competition fair and just in this one-design class.
  • Members learn about sailmaker group purchase discounts which can reduce the price of a suit of sails for your boat.
  • Remember: Unless you are a member, we do not have the easy ability to get in touch with you.
  • In summary, membership in this class gives you more tools to be a better sailor. Whether you belong to an area with an active fleet, or you are the only Santana 20 Sailor in your harbor, you will benefit directly from being a member.

What You Support

  • When you join this class, your membership dues support the activities that actively promote this class. This website, the newsletter, national advertising are examples of specific things that add new Santana 20 sailors and this is key to the success of this boat and your racing enjoyment. If you have benefited from these activities in the past, we ask that you continue to support the class so that you and others may continue to gain from the experience of owning a Santana 20.
  • When you bought your Santana 20 boat, you will have found yourself being helped by many other sailors who own a Santana 20. Each one of these sailors, and especially the people who contribute their time and effort for the benefit of the national class association and the local fleets such as the officers, fleet captains and directors, have the goal of improving the racing in the class by having more boats and more events. All that these people ask is that you contribute your share to help achieve these goals and in the end, it benefits you as well.

 

Where Are They Now?

Display List

If you know of a Santana 20 not listed or of a listing that needs to be updated, please fill out the following form or send us an email at santana20class@gamil.com.

Data provided is occasionally used by the Santana 20 Class Association to help fellow Santana 20 owners and sailors communicate with each other.  Otherwise, all details are kept confidential.


Name *
Name
Class Members? *
New Style Deck? *
Wing Keel *
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Tom Schock unveiled his new boat (Hull #900) at the S20 Nationals in Eugene, OR in 1996. It's taken me this long to lose the photos, find them, and scan them in. So now that this boat has won the 1997 Nationals I guess it's time for the world to see the boat up close.

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These first two shots show the major design change -- the open transom and the decks rolled down to the cockpit floor. This was intended to give the boat a more modern look and be friendlier on the crew. The left hand photo also has a good look at the new jib tracks. The jury is still out on the placement of them, but the new boats have done well with Tom's placement. Also in the left hand photo you get a good idea of what the boat looks like with the traveller moved forward 9".

 

This next shot is a close-up of the transom showing the detail of the new tiller and how it goes through the floor. Tom has also put a barney post on his boat so the main sheet will always be in the same place. Notice the new backstay and how it is split and attaches to the transom.

This next shot is a close-up of the transom showing the detail of the new tiller and how it goes through the floor. Tom has also put a barney post on his boat so the main sheet will always be in the same place. Notice the new backstay and how it is split and attaches to the transom.

This shot shows more detail of the control console. Gone are the wood guides for the hatch cover. They have been replaced by a low profile fiberglas "lip" that will hold the hatch cover, but not break when you stand on it. Also missing here is the forward winch pedestals. They were removed since most folks don't use them.  

This shot shows more detail of the control console. Gone are the wood guides for the hatch cover. They have been replaced by a low profile fiberglas "lip" that will hold the hatch cover, but not break when you stand on it. Also missing here is the forward winch pedestals. They were removed since most folks don't use them.

 

This interior shot is taken looking aft into the quarter berth. Notice how the aft quarter berth is much bigger with the new side tanks on the deck. There is a lot more headroom now. You may also see the lead in the keel pan. That was there because the keel was too light when the boat was put together. The crew was working on the boat to add weight right up until the regatta started. That's why the boat was christened "Still Wet".  

This interior shot is taken looking aft into the quarter berth. Notice how the aft quarter berth is much bigger with the new side tanks on the deck. There is a lot more headroom now. You may also see the lead in the keel pan. That was there because the keel was too light when the boat was put together. The crew was working on the boat to add weight right up until the regatta started. That's why the boat was christened "Still Wet".

 

The last shot is taken looking into the starboard side of the V-berth. Notice the cutaway bulkhead. It makes it easier to move around up there and also lets more light in. The bulkheads are now fastened at the bottom with 1/4" bolts and big fender washers. This is a big plus as the boat gets older. Hope you enjoy the photos  

The last shot is taken looking into the starboard side of the V-berth. Notice the cutaway bulkhead. It makes it easier to move around up there and also lets more light in. The bulkheads are now fastened at the bottom with 1/4" bolts and big fender washers. This is a big plus as the boat gets older.

Hope you enjoy the photos

 

 

Hull #920 - The Newest Boat from WD Schock